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The roles of intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein 25 in mammalian signaling transduction and flagellogenesis


1 Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430065, China
2 Center of Scientific Research and Experiment, Nanyang Medical College, Nanyang 473006, China
3 Department of Physiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA

Correspondence Address:
Ling Zhang,
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430065
China
Zhi-Bing Zhang,
Department of Physiology; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/aja202179

PMID: 34747727

Cilium, an organelle with a unique proteome and organization, protruding from the cell surface, generally serves as a force generator and signaling compartment. During ciliogenesis, ciliary proteins are synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into cilia by intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles, where the inner counterparts undergo reverse trafficking. The homeostasis of IFT plays a key role in cilial structure assembly and signaling transduction. Much progress has been made on the mechanisms and functions of IFT; however, recent studies have revealed the involvement of IFT particle subunits in organogenesis and spermatogenesis. In this review, we discuss new concepts concerning the molecular functions of IFT protein IFT25 and how its interactions with other IFT particle subunits are involved in mammalian development and fertility.


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    -  Man YH
    -  Warmbrunn I
    -  Zhang L
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